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Electrical Engineering (1st)

These projects are at the midpoint of a two-semester sequence.  They are not complete.


Power Source System

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Sponsor: Ingram Readymix Inc.

Student Team: Benjamin Schneider, Oswaldo Esqueda, Alex Flores, Austin Krogman

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Rich Compeau

Due to environmental regulations, any water that leaves the Ingram concrete plant must be tested for pH and hazardous substances. This project will provide a self-sufficient power source that will supply energy to the testing sensors as well as a structural support system that houses and protects the power source system. The system includes a 12VDC battery, solar panels, a support system, and a metal base onto which solar panels and a broadcast antenna can be affixed. This will allow the sensors to operate independently and to provide necessary outfall information to the plant's office.


Data Logging and Printing

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Sponsor: Ingram Readymix Inc.

Student Team: Celina Gonzalez, Fahad Alzhrani, Christopher Savala, Beau Welder

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Rich Compeau

This project includes the setup of a functioning communication system between the Ingram office building and the outfall system located at the retention pond approximately 600ft away. We will use wireless devices to transmit and receive data between the outfall sensor and office base station. This system aims to remove the need for a plant worker to manually check for water outfall.


Smart Irrigation System

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Sponsor: Sensco

Student Team: Fasbir Anwar, Alex Olsen, Christopher Ramirez, Lucas Humpal, Kevin Hua

Faculty Advisor: Mr. Lee Hinkle

This project consists of data analytics, and the design and implementation of a web application. Packets of data from the sensors are to be gathered and transmitted to the Microsoft Azure Cloud Platform. The data received are to be analyzed to further be interfaced into the web application. The sets of data will consist of humidity, temperature, soil moisture and water flow. The web application enables the user to control and view the water consumption during irrigation with respect to the environment.


Keysight IoT Courseware

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Sponsor: Keysight Technologies

Student Team: Paul Hopkins, Kendall Beal, Emmanuel Espinola, Dalton Vasquez

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Damian Valles

This project involves the use of the Keysight Technologies new IoT courseware which consists of 14 labs, the U3800A board, multiple sensors, and Bluetooth capability. Our team will be beta testing this entire courseware to determine their suitability as an instructional apparatus for high school STEM students, EE college students, and other hobbyists interested in learning more about IoT. The team will annotate and review the courseware lab projects and provide objective feedback along with creating an additional smart house based lab designed to take full advantage of the IoT courseware package.


DC to Three-Phase Motor Controller

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Sponsor: Texas State University; Ingram School of Engineering

Student Team: Stephen Akanji, Migdalia Blanco, Daniel Caballero, Alex Rangel

Faculty Advisor: Mr. Nathan England

Texas State University has begun constructing a car to participate in the American Solar Challenge (ASC). A DC to a three-phase variable speed motor controller will be designed and fabricated for a three-phase traction motor using a variable frequency drive. The overall goal of this project is to convert a DC signal, supplied by a 120V battery, to a three-phase AC output by building a three-phase inverter. In order to stay within the bounds of the project budget, the target is to increase the power available to a lightweight motor, and to attain the desired speed and torque necessary to drive the solar vehicle.


Systems Integration for Solar Car

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Sponsor: Ingram School of Engineering

Student Team: Mark Ferro, Abigail Gennero, Rachel Liebchen, Armel Hager

Faculty Advisor: Mr. Nathan England

This project involves the design and implementation of previously designed components for the Texas State solar car that will eventually compete in the American Solar Challenge, a cross country race. The system will be responsible for providing power, grounding, as well as, transmitting data between components. A control system will be developed to control the data that is being transmitted. The system will be reliable enough to operate under high stress. The completed system will be installed on a golf cart for testing.


HexiHeart

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Sponsor: NXP Semiconductors

Student Team: Alex Song, Jasmine Rounsaville, Neil Baker, Issam Hichami

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Larry Larson

The HexiHeart project will take advantage of many of the onboard Hexiwear sensors and capabilities to create a multifunctional watch. HexiHeart will monitor the wearer’s heart rate and notify when they enter or exit a desired heart rate range, will detect if the wearer falls and can alert another connected HexiHeart user, will have an option to send a panic alert to another connected HexiHeart user, and will calculate and display the ambient heat index. Hexiheart will be used to improve effeciency and safety of exercise activities such as running, or be used as a health and safety monitor for the elderly.


Hexiwear Smart Baby Monitor

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Sponsor: NXP Semiconductors

Student Team: James Lopez, Roberto Deanda, Jordan Walker, Burak Zeybek

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Maggie Chen

Using the NXP Hexiwear IoT device as a foundation, a Smart Baby Monitor will be developed in addition to an Android based mobile application. The monitor will relay real time sensor data to a cloud services platform, which will then be accessible by the Android application. The device will monitor temperature and humidity in the room, as well as notify the user when noise in the room passes a certain threshold. The Smart Baby Monitor will be a cost-effective solution amongst competing products in the market.


NXP Hexiwear Child Seat Sensor

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Sponsor: NXP Semiconductors

Student Team: Adam Banuelos, Tristian Blocker, Katerina Goldstein, Kenneth Shirley

Faculty Advisor: Dr. William Stapleton

This project will use NXP's Hexiwear platform to create a device that will notify a parent or guardian driver when it senses that a child has been left alone in a vehicle by taking advantage of Bluetooth's limited range. The driver’s phone will connect to a sensor placed near the child’s seat via Bluetooth connection. A child’s body weight will close switches places in the child seat informing the sensor of a child’s presence in the vehicle. When the child’s presence is detected, and the driver is out of the vehicle and beyond Bluetooth range, the driver will be notified that a child is in the car seat.


Duplex Open Repeater

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Sponsor: Texas State University

Student Team: Michael LePere, Jackie Zeppa, Angelo Powell, Garrett Roeder

Faculty Advisor: Dr. William Stapleton

Texas State University seeks a highly portable and simple to use off-grid duplex repeater for use during events and emergencies as a form of reliable communication. This project will utilize hardware and software recommendations from The Open Repeater Project to create a low cost, low power repeater that can be easily replicated for those who wish to build their own. Features of the repeater will be a minimum two-mile transmission radius, one day battery life, available SMA and UHF connectors for handheld and mobile transceivers, and the ability to edit the FCC required automated identification message while in field.


Portable UHF Open Repeater

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Sponsor: Ingram School of Engineering

Student Team: Logan Young, John Halliday, Charles Hinkle, Chris Schneider

Faculty Advisor: Dr. William Stapleton

This project involves utilizing a Raspberry Pi with two radios and a collapsible antenna system to implement a low cost, low power, portable UHF FM repeater. Individuals with handheld transceivers may call into the repeater to re-broadcast, effectively extending the signal over a larger area. By integrating the repeater function into the Pi, the entire system will be compact, facilitating incorporation into a durable, portable enclosure that connects with an appropriate collapsible antenna structure. With proper power management the repeater will operate off-grid.


Drifter Water Measurement Unit

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Sponsor: Jacobs/NASA

Student Team: Will Poeppelmeyer, Isaac Bondoc, John Marquez, Jacob Johnson

Faculty Advisor: Mr. Lee Hinkle

This project consists of a team of electrical engineering students and a team of manufacturing engineering students working together to make a floating unit that records water quality parameters. The 5 types of water measurements are temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, total dissolved solids, and pH. Measurements will be recorded to memory every 15 minutes. This is a new and improved version of a project that is intended to be a low-cost kit that will allow high school students and the public to get involved in collecting environmental data.


Prototype Sonification System

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Sponsor: NASA

Student Team: Patrick Zulka, Emily Beaudoin, Robnashea Saunders, German Noria

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Harold Stern

Due to round trip communications delay time NASA’s deep space missions will be challenged with providing the crew with timely notifications of vehicle/habitat system issues. Owing to the complex systems on these vehicles there will be many modes of failure. In the event of a vehicle going dark (no displays), one means of communicating vehicle status is auditory, hence the exploration of new methods of notifying the crew.


Toad Phone - Signal Processing and Transmission

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Sponsor: Texas State Department of Biology - Dr. Shawn McCracken and Dr. Michael Forstner

Student Team: Evan Whetzel, Dylan Patterson, Elliot White

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Georgios Koutitas

The Houston Toad is an endangered species found exclusively in nine counties in Southeast Texas, and it needs to be monitored. We are joining two second semester teams in furthering the development of the Toad Phone, an audio sensor that can detect the call of the Houston Toad, log the audio and atmospheric data, and transmit the compressed data to a cloud server. Our team is responsible for decreasing data transmission costs and expanding the recording frequency range of the soundcard in order to broaden the scope of endangered species this device is able to detect.