Skip to main content

Master of Science (MS)

The graduate program offered in the Ingram School of Engineering is the "Master of Science, Major in Engineering." 

For details on the program, including motivation, structure, and funding opportunities see the Program Overview and list of Frequently Asked Questions below.

Expand or Collapse all.

More Information

For more information, please or refer to the Program Brochure or the Graduate Catalog, or fill out the Information Request Form.

Apply for Admission

If you want to apply for graduate studies in Engineering, please refer to the Graduate College website for application instructions, application deadlines, and admission requirements.


Program Overview

Degree trajectories
MS in Engineering degree "trajectories" which illustrate program structure.

The degree is comprised of three separate concentration areas: Electrical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, and Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering.  Students declare a major in one of these three concentration areas. To provide a broad, multidisciplinary perspective, students majoring in a given concentration take elective courses from non-engineering disciplines, and may take elective courses from the other two concentrations as well. Thus, a Master's student may major in industrial engineering, but may take electives from mechanical and manufacturing engineering, business, computer science and math.

Multidisciplinary "Trajectories"

The figure illustrates possible "trajectories" through various segments of the program.  Courses are indicated by round dots enclosed in boxes representing segments of the curriculum, such as "EE" (Electrical Engineering), "IE" (Industrial Engineering), and "MFGE" (Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering).  The curriculum segments are identified by a pictorial legend at the top of each box:

  • Square = Multidisciplinary Electives (9 hours)
  • Circle = Engineering Core (3 + 6 + 9 hours)
  • Arrow = Thesis/Project and Seminar (6 + 1 hours)

Motivation and Purpose

The program, designed with input and support from such major industry figures as Texas Instruments, Samsung, Tokyo Electron and Dell, will produce Master’s-level graduates to meet an expected 11 percent national increase in the demand for engineers in the near term. Texas alone is projected to need more than 6,000 new engineers a year to meet this demand. Most of the new employment growth is due to increasing demand for engineers in areas which require advanced degrees, such as research and development and design and consulting services.

The program complements other programs in the state, which focus primarily on discipline-specific graduate degrees, such as “Master of Science in Electrical Engineering.” The Texas State program will provide graduates with a broad, multidisciplinary perspective in key areas of engineering through a structure that differs from existing programs.

The net effect of the Master of Science, Major in Engineering program is to produce graduates with a well-defined area of primary expertise as well as broad exposure to topics related to engineering. Such a blend of skillsets in depth in a chosen engineering concentration combined with breadth in related disciplines the program offers is extremely well-received by industrial partners.

Industry Focus

The MS Engineering degree provides a practical, industry-driven focus via a long-term, targeted technical project or thesis related to real-world engineering applications. These projects will be conducted in partnership with local industries, and may involve off-campus collaborations. The degree requires a large-scale project or thesis because the abilities to solve problems, innovate and make immediate contributions to industry are best developed by having students confront a large, open-ended problem, perform detailed research on the problem, develop various solutions, choose and implement the best solution, validate their choice and effectively communicate the process to professional colleagues, executives and customers.


Answers to Frequently Asked Questions


Program Structure

The degree requires a minimum of 34 hours:

  • 18 hours of “Engineering Core” courses (9 required, 9 elective)
  • 9 hours of “ Multidisciplinary Elective” courses (9 elective)
  • 7 hours of “General Core”, including 1 hour of seminar and at least 6 hours of thesis or project

Engineering Core

The Engineering Core is contains 18 hours, and is divided into three segments:

The General required course, ENGR 5310, includes foundational topics common to all engineering disciplines such as probability, random variables, and stochastic processes. All students must take this course in their first semester.

Concentration-specific required courses (two courses, 3 hours each) are specified by Ingram School faculty and include foundational topics for each specific engineering concentration. All students must take 6 hours of concentration-specific required courses.

Engineering electives (three courses, 3 hours each) are specified by the student’s graduate committee for his/her plan of study.

For a complete listing of Engineering Core courses, please click here.

Multidisciplinary Electives

The Multidisciplinary Elective courses (9 hours) are specified by the student's graduate committee and are chosen from a set of non-engineering disciplines, including Business, Technology, Mathematics, Computer Science, Physics, or Chemistry. These electives are listed here.

General Core

The General Core consists of at least 7 hours of common coursework and a thesis or project.

Common coursework in the General Core consists of ENGR 5100 (Seminar, 1 hour).

The remaining General Core hours consist of at least 6 hours of Project courses ENGR 5x98x for the project option, or at least 6 hours of Thesis courses ENGR 5x99x for the thesis option.

For more information on the General Core courses, please click here.


Thesis or Project?

The program has two options.  All students must complete six (6) hours in one of these options at the end of the degree program.

Thesis Option: Academic Research

The Thesis Option culminates with a traditional thesis focused on an academic research topic.  Most students will complete the Thesis Option. 


All students have a faculty advisor and a graduate committee composed of a minimum of three approved graduate faculty members (including faculty advisor).

The faculty advisor provides technical direction for the student’s thesis, and the committee approves the proposal, receives progress reports, and approves the final presentation and final written report.

Oral thesis defense is used as the comprehensive examination.

For more details, please click here for Thesis option information.

Project Option: Industry-Driven Project

The Project Option is directed technical research focused on a practical, industry-driven project.  The Project Option is not a non-thesis degree option. 

To complete the Project Option, students must be engaged with an industry partner via a funded, faculty-driven interaction.


All students have a faculty advisor and a graduate committee composed of a minimum of three approved graduate faculty members (including faculty advisor).

The faculty advisor provides technical direction for the student’s project, and the committee approves the proposal, receives progress reports, and approves the final presentation and final written report.

Oral project presentation is used as the comprehensive examination.

For more details, please click here for Project option information.


Funding Opportunities

The Ingram School of Engineering has a limited number of Graduate Research Assistantships, Graduate Instructional Assistantships, and Ingram Graduate Scholarships, each qualifying for in-state tuition representing substantial savings.  These awards are made on a competitive basis from among highly qualified applicants admitted to MS Engineering. No separate application is required.

Graduate Research Assistantships (GRA)

Faculty in the Ingram School maintain a limited number of Graduate Research Assistantship (GRA) positions to highly qualified applicants in the “Master of Science, Major in Engineering” graduate program.

GRA positions are available as part of various funded research activities managed by individual faculty members.  GRA's assist Ingram School faculty in the completion of research activities.  These research activities may be directly associated with the student's thesis/project work.

GRA Requirements

  • To be eligible for consideration, students must be admitted to the MS Engineering program by the Graduate College and must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 as calculated by the Graduate College.
  • To be eligible for continued GRA funding, awardees must maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 on graduate-level course work.
  • Students must be enrolled full-time in each semester for which they receive a GRA award.

GRA Award Process

  • Ingram School faculty members evaluate all eligible students in the MS Engineering program, and award GRA funding based on project requirements and funding availability.
  • The number of GRA positions awarded depends upon available funds, qualification of applicants, and requirements of funded projects.

Other Useful Information

  • GRA positions carry a monthly stipend as determined by their sponsoring faculty member.
  • GRA's are expected to work 20 hours/week in research activities as specified by the sponsoring faculty member.
  • A non-resident recipient may qualify for in-state tuition, per TEC 54.212, for each period in which they receive GRA funding.

Graduate Instructional Assistantships (GIA)

The Ingram School of Engineering offers a limited number of Graduate Instructional Assistantship (GIA) positions to highly qualified applicants joining the “Master of Science, Major in Engineering” graduate program.

GIA positions are available primarily for newly-admitted students, and are awarded on a per-semester basis.  GIA positions assist Ingram School faculty in the management and instruction of undergraduate classes and labs.

GIA Requirements

  • To be eligible for consideration, students must be admitted to the MS Engineering program by the Graduate College and must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 as calculated by the Graduate College.
  • To be eligible for continued GIA funding, awardees must maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 on graduate-level course work, and must obtain excellent progress reports from faculty and students.
  • Students must be enrolled full-time in each semester for which they receive a GIA award.

GIA Award Process

  • The Ingram Graduate committee evaluates all eligible students who have been newly-admitted to MS Engineering each year.
  • The committee reviews application documents submitted to the Graduate College (i.e., transcripts, GRE test scores, resume, statement of purpose, and reference letters) and makes recommendations for GIA awards.
  • The number of GIA positions awarded depends upon available funds and qualification of applicants.

Other Useful Information

  • Each GIA position carries a monthly stipend of approximately $1,300 during the semester of the award.
  • GIA's are expected to work 20 hours/week in providing undergraduate instructional support as required by Ingram School faculty.
  • A non-resident recipient may qualify for in-state tuition, per TEC 54.212, for each period in which they receive GIA funding.

Ingram Graduate Scholarship (IGS)

The Ingram School of Engineering offers the Ingram Graduate Scholarship (IGS) to highly qualified applicants joining the “Master of Science, Major in Engineering” graduate program. This scholarship is available for newly-admitted students only. Scholarships are awarded for the academic year and disbursed on a per-semester basis.

Scholarship Requirements

  • To be eligible for consideration, students must be admitted to the MS Engineering program by the Graduate College prior to April 1, and must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.25 as calculated by the Graduate College.
  • To be eligible for continued IGS funding, awardees must secure a GPA of at least 3.5 on graduate-level course work in the prior semester.
  • Students must be enrolled in a minimum of six credit-hours of graduate level courses (5000 or above) in each semester for which they receive the scholarship. Students falling below the required minimum credits will forfeit scholarship eligibility.

Scholarship Award Process

  • The Ingram Graduate Scholarship committee evaluates all eligible students who have been newly-admitted to MS Engineering as of April 1 each year.
  • The committee reviews application documents submitted to the Graduate College (i.e., transcripts, GRE test scores, resume, statement of purpose, and reference letters) and makes recommendations for the scholarship awards.
  • Preference will be given to U.S. citizens or permanent resident aliens.
  • The number of scholarships awarded depends upon available funds and qualification of applicants.

Other Useful Information

  • Each scholarship is nominally valued at $2,000, awarded over two long semesters of the student’s first year of study: $1000 for the fall semester and $1000 for the following spring semester. Amounts larger or smaller than $2,000 may be awarded in certain cases, depending upon the availability of funds and qualification of applicants.
  • A non-resident recipient may qualify for in-state tuition, per TEC 54.213, for the award year in which they receive this competitive scholarship.

Graduate College Scholarships

The Graduate College offers two competitive scholarships for Master's students:

  • The Celebrity Classic Scholarship
  • The Graduate College Scholarship

For information including eligibility requirements and application instructions and deadlines, please visit the Graduate College website.